Learning from old stories


Today’s blog is again going to contain an internet email story. I have received this email more than once. The one I liked the best was a power point that included a whole series of pictures of children.

I don’t plan to run internet email stories  very often, although I think they are often good jumping off points for discussion. I’m sure many of you know the wisdom of hot chocolate. If you have been on the internet for any length of time you have probably seen it in your mailbox more than once. I have.

 I think besides reminding us of our choice of material things, it also reminds me of my choice of people and how I treat them. I have never been one to be attracted to those with the most expensive of everything…clothes, house, shoes, jewelry, cars. Those things have never meant that much to me.  I think if I were given the opportunity I would be much better friends with Warren Buffet than I would Donald Trump. Perhaps it is from knowledge that I don’t expect persons like the Trump  to be especially attracted to me. I’m rather plain.

Nor have I ever been attracted to those that are smelly, rattily dressed, and greasy-haired. Just because I am not attracted to either one however, does not mean that I should not show the same consideration and warmth to all of them.

I think from this story I’ll be more aware of the people around me. If I am not consciously treating everyone the same, I shall endeavor to do so. All of us have the same hot chocolate inside of us. It’s only the outer cups that make some of us truly different. I apologize to the original author of this story. I can not find a name to whom I could give credit. Namaste. Attic Annie

 
 
THE WISDOM OF HOT CHOCOLATE
A group of graduates, well established in their careers, were discussing their lives at a class reunion. They decided to go visit their old university professor, now retired, who was always an inspiration to them.

During their visit, the conversation turned to complaints about stress in their work, lives and relationships. Offering his guests hot chocolate, the professor went into the kitchen and returned with a large pot of hot chocolate and an assortment of cups. Some cups were porcelain, glass, crystal, some plain looking, some expensive, some exquisite. He invited each to help them selves to the hot chocolate.

When they all had a cup of hot chocolate in hand, the professor shared his thoughts. “Notice that all the nice looking, expensive cups were taken, leaving behind the plain and cheap ones.

“While it is normal for you to want only the best for yourselves, that is the source of your problems and stress.”

“The cup that you are drinking from adds nothing to the quality of the hot chocolate. In most cases it is just more expensive and in some cases even hides what we drink.”

“What each of you really wanted was hot chocolate. You did not want the cup . . . but you consciously went for the best cups. And soon, you began to eye one another’s cups.”

“Now friends, please consider this . . . Life is the hot chocolate . . . your job, money and position in society are the cups. They are just tools to hold and contain life. The cup you have does not define, nor does it change, the quality of life you are living.”

“Sometimes, by concentrating only on the cup, we fail to enjoy the hot chocolate God has provided us.”

“Always remember this . . . God brews the hot chocolate, He does not choose the cup.”

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It's Not the Cup!

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